Electives (HS)

EL000 -Integrated Learning Strategies

Integrated Learning Strategies is a non-credit course which course offers supportive instruction to teach skills necessary for success across all of their coursework including time management, goal-setting, research skills, note-taking skills, and decision-making skills.
Prerequisite(s): Demonstrated ability to remain on task during individual work situations

SS470 – Global Issues

This class is designed to build an awareness about global issues and to engage in positive solutions for a sustainable future across the world and in our own communities. The curriculum includes social studies, environmental science, language, literacy and real-world math. Case studies, hands-on activities, one-day educational field trips, volunteer work and engaging guest speakers will give you a chance to step beyond the textbook and be part of the solution! Little homework is required as we complete most of the assignments in class and in small groups. Prerequisite: None.

SS471 – Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (Grades 11-12) (Dual Enrollment Option)

Culture is what children find when they are born. As they are instantly immersed in a set of shared attitudes, values and practices, passed down from generation to generation, they quickly learn the ways of their people and acquire a sense of common identity. We find an amazing diversity of traditions all over the world and it is the purpose of Cultural Anthropology to understand this complex tapestry. In an increasingly globalized and multicultural environment, Anthropology gives a strong foundation for any career and throughout this semester, we will see how anthropologists apply their skills to tackle social, economic, and cultural issues in the contemporary world. Introduction to Anthropology is part of the Coconino Community College’s High School to CCC (HS2CCC) program. Under the Arizona General
Education Curriculum (GIEC), this dual enrollment class will give students 3 credits, whether in Arts and Humanities or in Social and Behavioral Sciences. It also meets GIEC special requirements (Ethnic, Race and Gender Awareness or Contemporary Global /International or Historical awareness).
ANT 102 at CCC is excellent course for high school juniors and seniors who plan to transfer to an Arizona university, as it counts as a general education core class at ASU and NAU, and as a departmental elective course at UA. It also meets a couple of special requirements at all these institutions. Furthermore, ANT 102 is accepted as a general education course in most out of state universities.

EL601 – Introduction to Psychology (Grades 11-12)

This course covers a broad range of phenomena relating to what it is to be human. In this course, students will study the science of psychology including theories, research methods and experiments, the brain and behavior, memory, human development, sleep/sleep disorders, states of consciousness, learning, motivation and emotion, personality, psychological disorders, therapies, and social psychology. This course can be considered as a fifth core class in place of a fourth year of science or foreign language.

EL950 – Introduction to Computer Science with Java Script (Grades 9-12)

The Code HS introduction to computer science curriculum teaches the foundations of computer science and basic programming, with an emphasis on helping students develop logical thinking and problem- solving skills. Once students complete the CodeHS Introduction to Computer Science course, they will have learned material equivalent to a semester college introductory course in Computer Science and be able to program in JavaScript.
Prerequisite(s): Algebra I.  Course Fee projected to be $85.

EL951 – Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science Principles (Grades 9-12)

AP Computer Science Principles is designed to be equivalent to a first semester introductory college computing course. In this course, students will develop computational thinking skills vital for success across all disciplines, such as using computational tools to analyze and study data, and working with large data sets to analyze, visualize, and draw conclusions from trends. The course engages students in the creative aspects of the field by allowing them to develop computational artifacts based on their interests. Students will also develop effective communication and collaboration skills by working individually and collaboratively to solve problems and will discuss and write about the impacts these solutions could have on their community, society, and the world. Prerequisite(s): Algebra I. Course Fee projected to be $85 for SY 2018-19. AP Exam Fee (from 2019; may be higher in 2020): $94 

EL302 – Model United Nations (MUN) (Grades 9-12)

MUN students will build deeper understanding of current global issues, make evidence-based arguments while maintaining diplomacy, and develop formal speaking skills, often via role playing from a foreign country’s perspective. The material will focus on modern history subjects as they relate to current global concerns for the whole class, with each individual choosing from approximately 20 focus topics per year. These topics include issues such as women’s studies, medicine, humanitarian causes, regulating emerging technology, and sustainable resources. The classroom activities will include role playing, video, research, discussion, and presentation by both teacher and students. The culminating activity of this class will be the University of Arizona Conference in March.

EL941 – Introduction to Engineering Design (Grades 11-12)

This course introduces the design process, problem-solving techniques, team-work skills, oral and written communication skills, presentation skills and tools for success in academic and professional careers. These skills will be developed through reading and writing assignments, multiple hands-on design projects, exposure to the 3-dimensional software SolidWorks, and some engineering guest speakers. Course fee required. This course can be considered as a fifth core class in place of a fourth year of science or foreign language.

CS401 – Advanced Placement (AP) Seminar

In AP Seminar, students will examine materials like news stories, research studies, and literary works so that they may craft arguments to support a particular point of view and communicate it effectively through the use of various media. Students will be assessed through a combination of individual and team projects and presentations as well as through a written exam. AP Seminar is the first of two courses in the AP Capstone™ program. AP Research is the second course. If you earn scores of 3 or higher in AP Seminar and AP Research and on four additional AP Exams of your choosing, you will receive the AP Capstone Diploma™. This signifies outstanding academic achievement and attainment of college-level academic and research skills. Alternatively, if you earn scores of 3 or higher in AP Seminar and AP Research only, you will receive the AP Seminar and Research Certificate™. AP Exam Fee (from 2019; may be higher in 2020): $142

CS402 – Advanced Placement (AP) Research

While working with an expert advisor, students in AP Research will explore an academic topic, problem, or issue that interests them and design, plan, and conduct a year-long research-based investigation to address it. The course culminates in an academic paper of 4,000-5,000 words and a presentation, with an oral defense; during which you will answer 3-4 questions from a panel of evaluators. AP Research is the second course in the AP Capstone™ program. AP Seminar is a prerequisite for AP Research. If you earn scores of 3 or higher in AP Seminar and AP Research and on four additional AP Exams of your choosing, you will receive the AP Capstone Diploma™. This signifies outstanding academic achievement and attainment of college-level academic and research skills. Alternatively, if you earn scores of 3 or higher in
AP Seminar and AP Research only, you will receive the AP Seminar and Research Certificate™.
Prerequisite: AP Seminar and approval of instructor AP Exam Fee (from 2019; may be higher in 2020): $142

EN203 – Creative Writing I (10th-12th Grade)

This course is available for 10th through 12th grade students. Students will explore a wide range of texts that cover specific themes, genres, or styles and study specific writing techniques that are used in those texts. To further build upon these skills, students will compose their own works while applying the techniques they’ve been reading and analyzing. Creative written expression will be the focus of the course, and students will gain a wide range of tools to use in their personal fiction writing, as well as in their more formal academic writing. Skills and techniques used in their English courses will be emphasized and focused on as needed for the individual student and the writing assignment. Students will have the opportunity to learn countless techniques and apply them to short creative writing; additionally, students will compose multiple-draft pieces that will be published in various formats throughout the year.